error888:

Construction of the Hoover Dam. February 1934 [750x600] - Imgur

error888:

Construction of the Hoover Dam. February 1934 [750x600] - Imgur

chocolatefoood:

Ham, Swiss, and Jalapeño Stuffed Pretzels
style-cool-ture:

1912 Bugatti Type 16

style-cool-ture:

1912 Bugatti Type 16

ummhello
RipSurfer X
surfsetfitness.com

RipSurfer X
surfsetfitness.com

bassman5911:

Petersburg, Nebraska by twm1340 on Flickr.
laboratoryequipment:

Borrowing from Astronomy Sharpens Microscopic ImagesThe complexity of biology can befuddle even the most sophisticated light microscopes. Biological samples bend light in unpredictable ways, returning difficult-to-interpret information to the microscope and distorting the resulting image. New imaging technology developed at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Janelia Farm Research Campus rapidly corrects for these distortions and sharpens high-resolution images over large volumes of tissue.The approach, a form of adaptive optics, works in tissues that do not scatter light, making it well suited to imaging the transparent bodies of zebrafish and the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans, important model organisms in biological research. Janelia group leader Eric Betzig says his team developed the new technology by combining adaptive optics strategies that astronomers and ophthalmologists use to cancel out similar distortions in their images.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/borrowing-astronomy-sharpens-microscopic-images

laboratoryequipment:

Borrowing from Astronomy Sharpens Microscopic Images

The complexity of biology can befuddle even the most sophisticated light microscopes. Biological samples bend light in unpredictable ways, returning difficult-to-interpret information to the microscope and distorting the resulting image. New imaging technology developed at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Janelia Farm Research Campus rapidly corrects for these distortions and sharpens high-resolution images over large volumes of tissue.

The approach, a form of adaptive optics, works in tissues that do not scatter light, making it well suited to imaging the transparent bodies of zebrafish and the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans, important model organisms in biological research. Janelia group leader Eric Betzig says his team developed the new technology by combining adaptive optics strategies that astronomers and ophthalmologists use to cancel out similar distortions in their images.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/borrowing-astronomy-sharpens-microscopic-images

bassman5911:

KiraVan (via TRANSIT-CITY)

anti-skate:

OFF ROAD

anti-skate:

OFF ROAD